Make your Voice Count: Voter Registration at Dominican

By Lily Batchelor

Posted on September 26, 2017 at 10:41 AM PDT

National Voter Registration Day is today, Tuesday, September 26th, and Dominican University of California is gearing up to help students, staff and faculty register to vote. Stations will be set up all around the Dominican campus starting mid morning where students and staff will be encouraging the community to register through TurboVote, a non-profit organization that encourages the participation of voters and sends helpful reminders to those who sign up concerning local and national election deadlines and information.

Students who are already registered to vote still have much to gain from TurboVote since the organization sends emails and texts to remind voters of upcoming elections and important deadlines. The organization also caters to students personal situations, providing location-specific regulations and personalized information and materials.

“It is easy to miss an election, whether it is because you have moved and have forgotten to re-register, missed a deadline to register, didn't request an absentee ballot in time, or simply haven't been able to devote enough attention to the issues in upcoming elections,” says Alison Howard, chair of the Department of Political Science and International Studies at Dominican, “Even if you are already registered, there is still tremendous value in signing up for TurboVote. The reminders about upcoming elections and the ability to easily access the information you need to cast an informed vote is really the main benefit of TurboVote.”

Putting the ease of access and information TurboVote provides to the side, many young voters are still unsure if they want to register in the first place, however it’s important to realize the value of voting especially for college age students. According to Massvote.org, “For the past three decades voters have been disproportionately of higher income, older or more partisan in their interests. Parallel to participation gaps are widening gaps in wealth, reduced opportunity for youth and frustration with the polarization in politics.”

Voting is an important part of our Democratic process and the participation of students and young people is a crucial part in making sure the U.S. is a country that represents all classes, race and ages. Remember to drop by a registration booth in order to ensure your participation in the democratic process.